Ronde Island

Since our last post, we have actually followed through with our plan – something that doesn’t happen too often whilst you’re cruising!

We went up to Ronde Island for 10 days and had an absolute ball. We left St. Georges at about midday, along with Adonis and Field Trip, and we had about 15-20knts so it would be a pleasant sail. As usual, we all had our fishing lines out and the first to catch a fish would get a cake baked for them by the “losers”. We sailed along comfortably for about 4 hours with no fish and we were starting to get restless. We were about 30 minutes from Ronde Island when our reel started screeching as line was being taken off it. We all manned our battle stations and started working the fish to the boat. We were so close that we didn’t even bother to drop the sails. Dad had the VHF in his hand, ready to boast about our catch and to tell them to ready their ovens, when Mum suggested against it because as everyone knows, you don’t catch a fish until it’s on the deck. We worked the fish for about 10 minutes and we could see hints of green/yellow. “I think it’s a Mahi Mahi!” I called out excitedly. Everyone cheered in unison as we’d never had Mahi Mahi before and everyone raves about it. As we got it to within 20m of the boat my grin was wiped right off my face. “I think it’s a towel?!” I called. Sure enough, dragging through the water at the end of our line was a green towel. We all started grumbling to each other but in a matter of minutes they turned to laughs at what would be a great story to tell for some time. Thankfully, we didn’t have to face the embarrassment of radioing our friends explaining that a towel is definitely not a fish and they can turn their ovens off. We arrived at Ronde Island to a beautiful sunset and we shared stories over drinks and snacks on our boat that night.

The next day, we had our friends, Pollux, arrive. We almost had the anchorage all to ourselves and we anchored in nice and close to the beach thanks to the lot of us being on catamarans. Finally, three days after we arrived, after inspecting every boat we saw with binoculars, Seb and Krista arrived aboard their cat, Fairplay II. “It’s definitely them!” Kirana called as she peered through the binoculars. We all got up and waved as they came in and he second they had anchored, we all dinghied over to their boat to see them. We hadn’t seen these guys since we were in St. Martin so it was awesome to finally meet up with them again. They had our supplies that we asked them to get us which was excellent. We got so much chocolate and coffee that we have been paying people with it!

Seb is an avid diver and he has 2 tanks and a dive compressor on board his boat so he gave Dad and I a lesson and we ended up diving every day. Between Field Trip’s Brownie which can take 4 people, Randy’s one scuba tank and Seb’s 2 scuba tanks, we had more than enough equipment for us all to be diving together. On one dive, we went to explore a hole that we had found on the charts and, we went down to a depth of 22m and saw quite a few interesting things – including a monstrous lobster that would’ve made a great dinner!

Diving gives a whole new perspective

Diving gives a whole new perspective

Seb leading the way

Seb leading the way

Even Xav had a little dive with Seb and he loved it, so much so that he was pestering Seb for another dive everyday.

Learning to dive. This is how close our boats were!

Learning to dive. This is how close our boats were!

Seb's scuba school

Seb’s scuba school

Seb's scuba school

Seb’s scuba school

After 10 days of staying there, we were getting short on food and had to head back down to Grenada to resupply and get our engine looked at, as it hasn’t been starting properly for some time now. Pollux headed off and then we headed back to Grenada with Adonis while Field Trip went up to Petit Martinique to refuel and Fairplay II went North aswel to check out the Tobago Cays.

Giving Seb and Krista aboard Fairplay II a send off they won't forget anytime soon.

Giving Seb and Krista aboard Fairplay II a send off they won’t forget anytime soon.

On our way back, we had some dramas – as usual. No trip of ours would be complete without a little bit of drama! As we were leaving, we needed to lift our stern anchor which had been doing a great job of stopping us from swinging into a bunch of rocks. I went down to try and dig the anchor out of the sand a little as Dad pulled it up from the Dinghy. Just as we had it at the dinghy, Dad strained his back so any movement was agony. Considering living on a boat is quite an active lifestyle, this is not ideal. We managed to hoist the sails and head off. As we were sailing away from Ronde Island, I set the fishing line out, determined to catch something that was edible this time, and in my haste, I didn’t mention that I had put the line out to Dad. A few minutes later, we did a granny jibe (turning the boat 270˚ into the wind which is a much safer way of jibing, especially when Dad’s out of action). About an hour or 2 later, I noticed our fishing lure about 5m off our boat and considering we had about 30m of line out, something was wrong. I checked the line and it was in a giant twisted heap which can only mean one thing – the fishing line has decided to get friendly with our starboard propeller. Thankfully we weren’t motoring so the line wouldn’t be too tangled up. We dropped the sails and began to drift while I went into the water and cut the line out of the propeller. It might sound pretty simple but remember that this is about 8 miles off the coast in about 300m of water and the idea of sharks was definitely in the back of my mind. Thankfully, it was daytime unlike our fish trap encounter a while back! Anyway, we managed to carry on sailing for another few hours and then anchored back at St. Georges and a quick check showed that all the line was out of the prop – crisis averted!

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